Surrealism

Assignment:

  1. Write a surrealist poem. (Word count minimum = 150, word count max = 300)
  2. Create a surrealist piece of art. (Create using Illustrator–unless given permission–and upload an exported PDF to your submission folder).

Terms:

  • Surrealism
  • Symbols
  • Juxtaposition
  • Reversal
  • Transformation
  • Dislocation
  • Metamorphosis
  • Paranoiac-Critical Method
  • Double image paintings

Resources:

 

Satire

Assignment:

Create written and illustrated satirical works (one each – written and art). The two pieces do not have to match. You will create a spread for your written and illustrated work.

  • Spread
    • Document dimensions:
      • Lit. mag.: 9 x 7
      • Newspaper: 8.5 x 11
    • Upload PDF into Google Folder
      • Make PDF: 1) File 2) Export 3) PDF (print–not interactive) 4) Save as 5) Upload file into Google Drive and put in shared file
  • Written piece
    • length: minimum 250 words and maximum 500 words
    • Must use irony, sarcasm and exaggeration appropriately in order to make your audience think–you must have a point and use wit effectively.
    • Submit as Google Doc
  • Art piece
    • Create a satirical illustration by using the Illustrator
    • Upload Illustrator file into Google Drive

“Building Shapes and Using the Pen Tool in InDesign and Illustrator” – videos 1-6

Terms:

  • Irony
  • Sarcasm
  • Exaggeration

Resources:

Suggestions for further reading:

Common Core:

*Standard descriptions may be summarized and modified to include assignment rationale/purpose in parentheses

“English Language Arts Standards” by Common Core State Standards Initiative

  • RI.9-10.8
    • Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
  • RI.9-10.2
    • Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • RL.11-12.6
    • Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).
  • W 9-10.4
    • (Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience). 
  • SL: 1-4 — Critiquing process and class discussions
    • ([P]articipate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions […] with diverse partners […] building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly)
    • (Present information […] concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task)
  • L. 9-10.5 — Critiquing process
    • Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
      • (Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text).
      • (Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations).
  • W 9-10.5 — Brainstorming, revisions after critiques
    • (Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience).
  • W 9-10.6 — Using BPS Google Drive/Docs to store and submit work for publication
    • (Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically).

Song writing

Assignment:

Write a song using basic song structure, making sure to label the different components. You can choose to add music to it if you wish. You may also use a pre-existing song’s melody on which to base your words–however, you must cite the musician’s work.

Featured musicians:






I love playing the guitar and writing songs

Below are some past pictures and a very bad recording of recording of one of my old songs I wrote in college. It sounds like I’m underwater. 😦 I wish I had the original file.

My song (small piece): “Destructive Healing” (CAUTION: It may be loud! Turn down the volume if you are curious and really want to hear my singing).

Want to perform? Check out our events:

Resources:

Common Core:

*Standard descriptions may be summarized and modified to include assignment rationale/purpose in parentheses

“English Language Arts Standards” by Common Core State Standards Initiative

  • W 9-10.4
    • (Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience). 
  • SL: 1-4 — Critiquing process
    • ([P]articipate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions […] with diverse partners […] building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly)
    • (Present information […] concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task)
  • L. 9-10.5 — Critiquing process
    • Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
      • (Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text).
      • (Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations).
  • W 9-10.5 — Brainstorming, revisions after critiques
    • (Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience).
  • W 9-10.6 — Using BPS Google Drive/Docs to store and submit work for publication
    • (Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically).

Flash fiction – six word stories

Assignment:

Write five flash fiction stories, but they can only be six words each!

(They do not have to connect).

Resources:

Common Core:

*Standard descriptions may be summarized and modified to include assignment rationale/purpose in parentheses

“English Language Arts Standards” by Common Core State Standards Initiative

  • W 9-10.4
    • (Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience). 
  • SL: 1-4 — Critiquing process
    • ([P]articipate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions […] with diverse partners […] building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly)
    • (Present information […] concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task)
  • W 9-10.5 — Brainstorming, revisions after critiques
    • (Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience).
  • W 9-10.6 — Using BPS Google Drive/Docs to store and submit work for publication
    • (Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically).

Ekphrasis (poetry)

Assignment:

Taken directly from Poets.org:

“Write a poem in three stanzas that is based on an image or work of art. In the first stanza, focus solely on description. In the following stanzas, take your own approach: you can continue to describe, impose a narrative on the scene, or reveal something about yourself or the artist. In revision, pay careful attention represent all of the senses in your description.”

Resources:

Examples (art pieces referenced in articles in links above)

Pieter Bruegel “Landscape with the Fall of Icarus” Taken from: http://community.tncc.edu/faculty/dollieslager/images/icarus2.jpg

 

“Once the ambition of producing a complete and accurate description is put aside, a poem can provide new aspects for a work of visual art.”

– Alfred Corn

Quote taken from Poets.org

 

A picture of a shield made on the Achille’s shield concept. Taken from: https://themodernistexperiment.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/shield-of-achilles.jpg Read the full post on the link above. It gives great insight into the ekphrasis using this shield as a subject.

 

 

Haiku (poetry)

Assignment: 

  • Write five haiku
    • One haiku must deal with nature to play with the classic theme since the original form used nature as its subject.
    • The other four can your choice. You can choose to connect them or make them independent.

Resources:

It is more than likely you already know what a haiku is–purely based on Internet memes regarding refrigerators…

Though these are cute at first sight–I want you to go past cliche and aim for depth. I’m not against humor, but I’ve had tons of haiku poems about the process of writing haiku. If you do this, I will have you go back and write another.

My face when I get poems like this…

Now I’m going to contradict myself a bit. Hear me out. Once you learn the rules, you can learn how to break them creatively. Here is an example from Rick Riordan’s Titan’s Curse where a character displays his cheeky charm by reciting sarcastic haiku:

“He cleared his throat and held up one hand dramatically.
“Green grass breaks through snow.
Artemis pleads for my help.
I am so cool.”

He grinned at us, waiting for applause.
“That last line was four syllables.” Artemis said.
Apollo frowned. “Was it?”
“Yes. What about I am so big headed?”
“No, no, that’s six syllable, hhhm.” He started muttering to himself.
Zoe Nightshade turned to us. “Lord Apollo has been going through this haiku phase ever since he visited Japan. Tis not as bad as the time he visited Limerick. If I’d had to hear one more poem that started with, There once was a goddess from Sparta-“
“I’ve got it!” Apollo announced. “I am so awesome. That’s five syllables!” He bowed, looking very pleased with himself.”
Rick Riordan, The Titan’s Curse

Book excerpt taken from Goodreads.com.

I like how Riordan uses shallow haiku to reinforce Apollo’s happy-go-lucky personality and to add to the character’s banter. You can choose to incorporate this tone of haiku in a small, writing piece if you are able to showcase characterization.

Here is an example from a ‘Riot writer which gives excellent depth, and I love how her haiku act together to relate a story.

Read Haley Petersen’s set of haikus: “Now You Can’t Sleep Without Her” on page 61 of Perception.

News writing (introduction)

Terms from videos

  • headline
  • subheadline
  • lead
  • 5 w (who, what, why, where, when and how?)
  • Feature lead

How to write a lead (part 1)

How to write a lead (part 2)

How to write a lead (part 3)

How to write a lead (part 4)

Terms from articles and handout

  • Hook
  • Nut graf
  • Delayed or immediate identification
  • Multiple element lede/lead
  • Feature stories
  • Running head
  • Subhead
  • Pull quote
  • Byline
  • Credits
  • Folio

Resources

“The Bass, The River, and Sheila Mant”

story title

Grade: English 10

Discuss (SL:1)

  • What kinds of silly things to people do for love?
  • Have you ever acted like someone–other than yourself–around a person you were trying to impress?

Accessing prior knowledge

What are definitions/examples of the following terms?

  • Point of view
  • Flashback
  • Internal conflict
  • External conflict
  • Theme
  • Allusion

Watch and discuss (SL:1)

  • What is the conflict?
  • What does the narrator ultimately choose and what consequence does this choice have?
  • What would you choose?

Short story reading

Read  “The River, the Bass, and Sheila Mant.” The story starts on page 31 of the large, blue textbooks.

Answer the following

  1. What is the theme or central idea in the story? (RL. 2)
  2. How is flashback used in the story? (RL. 5)
  3. What point of view is the story told from? (RL. 6)
  4. What is specific textual evidence of what the main character learned from his experience? (RL. 1)

Vocabulary/allusions (RL. 4)

How can you understand what the word means in context of the story?

  1. Denizens
  2. Pensive
  3. Dubious
  4. Luminous
  5. Sculling

Resources

Common Core

*Standard descriptions are summarized and modified to include assignment rationale/purpose in parentheses

“English Language Arts Standards” by Common Core State Standards Initiative

  • SL:1 (Varying group discussions–partner, group and class. Students can express themselves clearly and listen to others).
  • RL: 2 (Determine theme and central idea and its development over the story)
  • RL: 3 (Analyze complex characters and plot development)
  • RL 4 (Determine meaning of vocabulary from story)
  • RL 5 (Understand structure of the story, specifically flashback)
  • RL 6 (Analyze point of view)

Writing a staff bio.

Video explaining lesson…

Discussion – accessing prior knowledge

*SL: 1 (Varying group discussions–partner, group and class. Students can express themselves clearly and listen to others).

In groups of 3-4, answer the following and then discuss with the class.

  1. What kind of information should be included in staff bios?
  2. What tones are appropriate in staff bios?
  3. What audience are you writing for?
  4. What is the look and mood wanted for our publications’ staff page?
  5. What are some common sense Internet safety tips?

Read the following how-to articles in your groups. Take brief notes so you can summarize the information and report back to the class.

*RI: 1-2 (After reading, use specific parts of reading to understand main message. Students can summarize text).

Kenna Griffin encourages the reader to include their contact information. This advice is geared toward working professionals who can include a work email or a phone number.

As a student, you will not be including your personal information or social media information. If necessary, you can include your publication’s email/social media info. and the school’s phone number so your adviser (me) can be reached. Use Internet safety regarding your personal info.

However, it is fine to include your name on the publications’ website since you are a student writer working on staff for your publication and using this monitored social media platform.

Internet safety is important.

StaySafeOnline.org urges students to use caution when posting and to not share personal information:

It is essential that students understand and commit to not sharing personal information with people they view as “friends” online. This includes their real name, address, phone number, financial information, school name, passwords, or other private information. [Read the full article.]

When using technology, make sure to adhere to the district’s technology policy. (Review policy).

What are others doing?

*RI: 6 (Can understand author’s point of view, purpose and use of rhetoric).

Read through the bios. below and think about…

  1. How does tone affects professionalism?
  2. Are tones and point of views consistent of all staff bios. featured?
  3. How do you think the authors considered audience?
  4. What kind of information is provided?

Example staff bios.

Write your own staff bio.

  • *W:2 (Students can write a informative text–staff bio.–clearly and accurately).
  • *L:1-2 (Can use conventions/grammar appropriately when writing or speaking).
  • *W:4 (Create appropriate, organized writing with task, purpose and audience in mind).
  • *W:5 (Planning, drafting, critiquing/work shopping and revising writing with analyzing purpose and audience).
  • *SL: 1 (Varying group discussions–partner, group and class. Students can express themselves clearly and listen to others).
  • *W:6 (Use Google Drive to share writing and publications’ website to publish staff bios).

Writing requirements

  • When you are writing and have style questions, refer to the style guide under “resources” on this blog post.
  • Point of view – third person
  • Use at least one quote – from yourself (third person)
  • Length – at least as long as adviser bio.
  • Rough draft – hand write to workshop and critique in groups
  • Final draft
    • Create a Google Drive folder and name it “newspaper”. Share the contents of the folder with the publication’s email.
    • Create a Google Doc labeled “staff bio” and type your final draft here. It will automatically be shared with the newspaper Google Drive if you shared the entire folder.
    • Confused? Watch the how-to video below…

Resources

*L:3 (Understand how language is used in style. Use a manual or style guide when writing or editing).

Assessment

Common Core

*Standard descriptions are summarized and modified to include assignment rationale/purpose in parentheses

“English Language Arts Standards” by Common Core State Standards Initiative

  • RI:1-2 (After reading, use specific parts of reading to understand main message. Students can summarize text).
  • RI:6 (Can understand author’s point of view, purpose and use of rhetoric).
  • SL:1 (Varying group discussions–partner, group and class. Students can express themselves clearly and listen to others).
  • W:2 (Students can write a informative text–staff bio–clearly and accurately).
  • L:1-2 (Can use conventions/grammar appropriately when writing or speaking).
  • L:3 (Understand how language is used in style. Use a manual or style guide when writing or editing).
  • W:4 (Create appropriate, organized writing with task, purpose and audience in mind).
  • W:5 (Planning, drafting, critiquing/work shopping and revising writing with analyzing purpose and audience).
  • W:6 (Use Google Drive to share writing and publications’ website to publish staff bios).