Satire

Assignment:

Create written and illustrated satirical works (one each – written and art). The two pieces do not have to match. You will create a spread for your written and illustrated work.

  • Spread
    • Document dimensions:
      • Lit. mag.: 9 x 7
      • Newspaper: 8.5 x 11
    • Upload PDF into Google Folder
      • Make PDF: 1) File 2) Export 3) PDF (print–not interactive) 4) Save as 5) Upload file into Google Drive and put in shared file
  • Written piece
    • length: minimum 250 words and maximum 500 words
    • Must use irony, sarcasm and exaggeration appropriately in order to make your audience think–you must have a point and use wit effectively.
    • Submit as Google Doc
  • Art piece
    • Create a satirical illustration by using the Illustrator
    • Upload Illustrator file into Google Drive

“Building Shapes and Using the Pen Tool in InDesign and Illustrator” – videos 1-6

Terms:

  • Irony
  • Sarcasm
  • Exaggeration

Resources:

Suggestions for further reading:

Common Core:

*Standard descriptions may be summarized and modified to include assignment rationale/purpose in parentheses

“English Language Arts Standards” by Common Core State Standards Initiative

  • RI.9-10.8
    • Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
  • RI.9-10.2
    • Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • RL.11-12.6
    • Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).
  • W 9-10.4
    • (Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience). 
  • SL: 1-4 — Critiquing process and class discussions
    • ([P]articipate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions […] with diverse partners […] building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly)
    • (Present information […] concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task)
  • L. 9-10.5 — Critiquing process
    • Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
      • (Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text).
      • (Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations).
  • W 9-10.5 — Brainstorming, revisions after critiques
    • (Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience).
  • W 9-10.6 — Using BPS Google Drive/Docs to store and submit work for publication
    • (Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically).

Music reviews and instructional articles/videos (how-to)

Writing music reviews resources

Writing instructional articles resources

Instructional videos

News writing (introduction)

Terms from videos

  • headline
  • subheadline
  • lead
  • 5 w (who, what, why, where, when and how?)
  • Feature lead

How to write a lead (part 1)

How to write a lead (part 2)

How to write a lead (part 3)

How to write a lead (part 4)

Terms from articles and handout

  • Hook
  • Nut graf
  • Delayed or immediate identification
  • Multiple element lede/lead
  • Feature stories
  • Running head
  • Subhead
  • Pull quote
  • Byline
  • Credits
  • Folio

Resources

Writing a staff bio.

Video explaining lesson…

Discussion – accessing prior knowledge

*SL: 1 (Varying group discussions–partner, group and class. Students can express themselves clearly and listen to others).

In groups of 3-4, answer the following and then discuss with the class.

  1. What kind of information should be included in staff bios?
  2. What tones are appropriate in staff bios?
  3. What audience are you writing for?
  4. What is the look and mood wanted for our publications’ staff page?
  5. What are some common sense Internet safety tips?

Read the following how-to articles in your groups. Take brief notes so you can summarize the information and report back to the class.

*RI: 1-2 (After reading, use specific parts of reading to understand main message. Students can summarize text).

Kenna Griffin encourages the reader to include their contact information. This advice is geared toward working professionals who can include a work email or a phone number.

As a student, you will not be including your personal information or social media information. If necessary, you can include your publication’s email/social media info. and the school’s phone number so your adviser (me) can be reached. Use Internet safety regarding your personal info.

However, it is fine to include your name on the publications’ website since you are a student writer working on staff for your publication and using this monitored social media platform.

Internet safety is important.

StaySafeOnline.org urges students to use caution when posting and to not share personal information:

It is essential that students understand and commit to not sharing personal information with people they view as “friends” online. This includes their real name, address, phone number, financial information, school name, passwords, or other private information. [Read the full article.]

When using technology, make sure to adhere to the district’s technology policy. (Review policy).

What are others doing?

*RI: 6 (Can understand author’s point of view, purpose and use of rhetoric).

Read through the bios. below and think about…

  1. How does tone affects professionalism?
  2. Are tones and point of views consistent of all staff bios. featured?
  3. How do you think the authors considered audience?
  4. What kind of information is provided?

Example staff bios.

Write your own staff bio.

  • *W:2 (Students can write a informative text–staff bio.–clearly and accurately).
  • *L:1-2 (Can use conventions/grammar appropriately when writing or speaking).
  • *W:4 (Create appropriate, organized writing with task, purpose and audience in mind).
  • *W:5 (Planning, drafting, critiquing/work shopping and revising writing with analyzing purpose and audience).
  • *SL: 1 (Varying group discussions–partner, group and class. Students can express themselves clearly and listen to others).
  • *W:6 (Use Google Drive to share writing and publications’ website to publish staff bios).

Writing requirements

  • When you are writing and have style questions, refer to the style guide under “resources” on this blog post.
  • Point of view – third person
  • Use at least one quote – from yourself (third person)
  • Length – at least as long as adviser bio.
  • Rough draft – hand write to workshop and critique in groups
  • Final draft
    • Create a Google Drive folder and name it “newspaper”. Share the contents of the folder with the publication’s email.
    • Create a Google Doc labeled “staff bio” and type your final draft here. It will automatically be shared with the newspaper Google Drive if you shared the entire folder.
    • Confused? Watch the how-to video below…

Resources

*L:3 (Understand how language is used in style. Use a manual or style guide when writing or editing).

Assessment

Common Core

*Standard descriptions are summarized and modified to include assignment rationale/purpose in parentheses

“English Language Arts Standards” by Common Core State Standards Initiative

  • RI:1-2 (After reading, use specific parts of reading to understand main message. Students can summarize text).
  • RI:6 (Can understand author’s point of view, purpose and use of rhetoric).
  • SL:1 (Varying group discussions–partner, group and class. Students can express themselves clearly and listen to others).
  • W:2 (Students can write a informative text–staff bio–clearly and accurately).
  • L:1-2 (Can use conventions/grammar appropriately when writing or speaking).
  • L:3 (Understand how language is used in style. Use a manual or style guide when writing or editing).
  • W:4 (Create appropriate, organized writing with task, purpose and audience in mind).
  • W:5 (Planning, drafting, critiquing/work shopping and revising writing with analyzing purpose and audience).
  • W:6 (Use Google Drive to share writing and publications’ website to publish staff bios).

The Interview: Tips from Professional Journalists

Common Core Standards for conducting interviews:

Questions

  1. What is the difference between an interview and a conversation?
  2. What is Tavis’ one rule if you want to be a good interviewer?
  3. What is a generous listener?
  4. What is the difference between leading or following a conversation?
  5. What does Tavis mean by “doing your homework”?

Questions:

  1. What does Katie suggest to make the interviewee comfortable?
  2. How does body language and tone affect the interview?
  3. Why does Katie suggest not using questions that require a “yes” or “no” answer?
  4. Why is it important to be a good listener and use following up questions?
  5. Why does Katie suggest in remembering who you are serving? What is the goal of an interview?
  6. How does Katie know her interview was effective?

Other resources: